Archive | Classroom Management Plan

Smart Classroom Management: How To Handle Misbehavior Outside Of Your Classroom

How To Handle Misbehavior Outside Of Your Classroom

Here at SCM, we’ve received a number of emails asking how best to handle students who misbehave outside the four walls of the classroom, but while still in your presence. In other words, how do you respond to rule-breaking while walking to lunch, for example, or at an assembly? It’s a thorny issue, because you […]

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Smart Classroom Management: How To Be Consistent With Classroom Management

How To Be Consistent With Classroom Management

Ask a hundred teachers if it’s important to be consistent with classroom management and every last one of them will tell you that it is. But knowing that it’s important is one thing. Actually being consistent is another. Most teachers only kinda-sorta follow their classroom management plan. Deciding whether to enforce a consequence not based […]

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Smart Classroom Management: How To Teach Your Classroom Management Plan

How To Teach Your Classroom Management Plan

Of all the responsibilities you have on the first day of school, teaching your classroom management plan is número uno in importance. After all, your success as a teacher hinges on your ability to manage your classroom. That’s just the way it is. Teachers who are nonchalant about classroom management, or who see it as […]

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Smart Classroom Management: How To Set Up A Simple, Effective Classroom Management Plan

How To Set Up A Simple, Effective Classroom Management Plan

The purpose of a classroom management plan is to hold students accountable for misbehavior—without having to yell, scold, or lecture. When used correctly, a classroom management plan eliminates the need to use these and other stressful, counterproductive methods. It allows you to demand impeccable behavior without causing friction and resentment. Which then frees you to […]

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a cartoon by Hugh MacLeod

A Classroom Management Plan That Works

In his book, Ignore Everybody: And 39 Other Keys To Creativity, Hugh MacLeod points out that Abraham Lincoln penned the Gettysburg Address on borrowed stationary. Hemingway wrote with a simple fountain pen. Van Gogh rarely used more than six colors on his palate. And MacLeod, himself an artist, sketches cartoons on the back of business […]

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