Tag Archives | enforcing consequences

Smart Classroom Management: How To Hold Difficult Students Accountable

How To Hold Difficult Students Accountable

Last week, a reader asked a question I’ve gotten a lot over the years. “How should I hold difficult students accountable?” It’s a topic I haven’t covered specifically because the answer is so simple and direct: Just like everyone else. You calmly approach the student. You deliver the news. “You have a warning for breaking […]

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Smart Classroom Management: An Easy Way To Keep Your Cool When Students Misbehave

An Easy Way To Keep Your Cool When Students Misbehave

Here at SCM, we’ve talked a lot about the importance of keeping your cool when enforcing consequences. We’ve covered how it helps ensure that the offending student takes responsibility for their actions. We’ve covered how it causes them to reflect on their mistakes. We’ve covered how it maintains, and even strengthens, your relationships with all […]

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Smart Classroom Management: Do You Ever Feel Coldhearted Enforcing Consequences?

Do You Ever Feel Coldhearted Enforcing Consequences?

The student looks up at you with pleading eyes. They’re distressed. They’re remorseful. They’re in anguish over the mistake they made. “Please . . . I’m so sorry. I promise I’ll never do it again.” Indeed, they appear for all the world to be contrite. You pause. You sigh. Every bone in your body is […]

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Smart Classroom Management: 3 Big Mistakes Teachers Make When Enforcing Consequences

3 Big Mistakes Teachers Make When Enforcing Consequences

Last week we talked about how to be consistent with your classroom management plan. Which is especially important to begin the school year. This alone will go a long way toward creating the learning environment you really want. Once you’ve conquered this challenge, however, there is another pitfall looming around the corner. You see, how […]

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Do You Need Proff to Hold students Accountable?

Do You Need “Proof” To Hold Students Accountable?

It’s not often I’m surprised by an email. But a couple years ago I received one from a teacher who wouldn’t hold students accountable unless he had what he described as “proof.” Unless he had witnesses to back him up, or an outright admission from the offender, then he felt he had to let the […]

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